“East West, Home’s Best”: Feminist Politics of Sue Townsend in Bazaar and Rummage

Authors

  • Özlem Özmen Akdoğan Muğla Sıtkı Koçman University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33831/jws.v22i2.245

Keywords:

Sue Townsend, Bazaar and Rummage, issue-based play, agoraphobia, patriarchal oppression, feminist criticism, Thatcher

Abstract

This paper discusses the social reasons for agoraphobia as a psychological disorder as observed in the women characters of British playwright Sue Townsend’s issue-based play Bazaar and Rummage (1982). The depiction of three agoraphobic women in a context characterised by patriarchal dominion constitutes the core of Townsend’s play. Although their problematic condition is presented rather comically, from their accounts, it seems apt to argue that societal oppression is the reason for their longlasting seclusion and constant fear of the outside world. The play offers a rummage sale as an opportunity for women to step outside and conquer their fear. Accordingly, in terms of presenting the psychological condition of women characters and associating the possible solution to their problem with a market occasion, Townsend’s play illustrates an example of feminist criticism. In this study, the play’s analysis is based on the 1980s context dominated by Thatcher politics, and Townsend’s portrayal of agoraphobia is discussed as a criticism of her society in which patriarchal hegemony plays a central role in women’s forced confinement.

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Published

2022-01-04

How to Cite

Özmen Akdoğan, Özlem. (2022). “East West, Home’s Best”: Feminist Politics of Sue Townsend in Bazaar and Rummage. Kadın/Woman 2000, Journal for Women’s Studies, 22(2), 19–33. https://doi.org/10.33831/jws.v22i2.245